Wednesday, August 31, 2016

ENFORCING

I've heard numerous times that people watch hockey for the fights, auto race fans watch for the crashes, and that nice guys finish last.  I cannot speak about the car races or nice guys, because there is no empirical evidence for them, but I do have anecdotal evidence that suggests the first statement is correct.  Almost everyone I know who watches hockey enjoys the fighting.  The only people I know who do not are my son and myself.  Either we don't enjoy hockey in the same way as other fans, or, we are not fans.  I assure you we are fans. 

"I went to a fight the other night, and a hockey game broke out."  Rodney Dangerfield

I am not suggesting that there is a proper way to watch or enjoy hockey.  I believe that there will be an erosion of the popularity of fighting as the world of political correctness attempts to soften the violence of the sport.  The player safety issue is a real one, however, and unless fighting stops, there will be an enormous amount of pressure to change the sport.  Brain injuries, alcoholism and pain med abuse, and dangerous behavior outside of the sport by the enforcers both current and from the past have led to a focus upon these players as dinosaurs needing removal.

But entropy is a truth that never changes.  The motion of a state goes from order to chaos.  I have no doubt that if fighting is removed hockey will lose popularity.  Fighting gives hockey a feeling of being unpredictable, exciting, it gives the sport an edge of a perception of imminent danger, however right or wrong that edge.

  
So, do I get worked up over fights as a human being if not as a fan?  Still no.  I watch some UFC, and boxing, but overall my view is that horrible things happen in the sport, and the allowance of fighting dirties the fluid grace that skating and speed, puck handling and shooting a small round rubber disk into a net, is.  The best aspects of the sport of hockey are made less by the actions of enforcers.

"Anybody who says they don't like fighting in the NHL have to be out of their minds."  Don Cherry


"The model for an NHL without fighting is right there in front of us. The [playoffs are] the time of year that fans love best; when the best hockey is played... [The] enforcers don't play. Even mini-enforcers... remain on the bench. Teams and coaches can't afford anything stupid and unpredictable... With no one to fight back for them, players go harder into the corners, more determinedly to the front of the net. If they want to fire up the crowd and their teammates, they have to do it themselves. And in the playoffs, they do."   Ken Dryden



 
"I had a few fights last year, but I need to take boxing lessons. I need to, because in the NHL it's required."   Maxim Kuznetsov


As proof of the popularity of the fighting, there are hockey card sets devoted to and celebrating the enforcers.  No matter how limited the role they play is, they are honored, and regarded as warriors, not as scoundrels or jerks with anger issues.




Friday, August 26, 2016

A return to action for the Hockey Blog.

Returning to blogging took a while.  I was at first dealing with cancer, then depression, then other issues like kidney stones... I am not just making excuses, but those are reasons.  I should reintroduce myself, but, it isn't so much about me, as it is about loving hockey.

I am a writer, published, self published, and poor.  I love hockey cards, watching games, talking hockey to like minded fans.  I am not, however, very typical for a viewer of sports.  Perhaps as a result of growing up with a father who loved a sports team unconditionally but people conditionally, I had to deal with a fan, right from the start, who was devout in his fellowship of football, all hail thee oh Minnesota Vikings.  Bless us oh father, Oh Fran Tarkington, oh Alan Page.  Well we lived in Wisconsin, in the 1960s, when the Packers were great, and Joe Namath was a rock star.  I liked the Packers and Jets, and my father gave me crap all the time.  So eventually, I gave up and liked his team, confused, perhaps, over the point.  We like who we like, right?  I loved him, he is now gone, but the moment he left us, I began to have a flood of realizations about sports likes and support.  I gave up any sort of favorites and reassessed my life.  And now, I primarily like the sports I like, for the sport, and the stories.  I used to have a list of teams I hate, but now, there are few teams I dislike even.  The Blackhawks of Chicago are pretty much the sole hockey team that qualifies as an enemy.  Quite differently, I remember the teams I loved, quietly, in the middle of football country.


While I liked hockey before then, when I watched the Minnesota Boys Hockey tournament in 1979,  after that, I followed every level of the sport.  I loved the North Stars, Nordiques, and Jets.  And many different teams in Minnesota, the Golden Gophers, UMD Bulldogs, Duluth East Greyhounds, and many more.  And the Olympics in Winter, oh hell yeah I loved the Hockey.  And I was very interested in the players from the behind the Iron Curtain.


During the 80s and 90s the spread of European athletes who had post Communist country roots, I began a love affair with even more aspects of the sport.  The KHL, German, Swedish, and Swiss leagues of hockey are now as interesting to me as any North American play.   For some reason, perhaps I am Latvian in descent deep within my DNA, I've liked the players from Latvia, and also Swedes and Finns.   So I am a person who reads articles about hockey, the NHL, KHL, and other leagues.  I wait for the spring tournaments and The Minnesota Boys' hockey tournament. 



I have favorite players, many more than the set of players I compiled.  And I have favorite teams, and memories of teams.  So I will be back sooner than the last time I said I would be back.  Best wishes, and go Islanders, Capitals, Habs, Jets, Dinamo Riga and every other team I support.

Thanks for your time.


"Bushido is realized in the presence of death.
This means choosing death whenever there
is a choice between life and death. There is
no other reasoning." Tsunetomo Yamamoto